2nd Book Problems

I know. My novel is, as of yet, unpublished. But that doesn’t mean it’s too early to start studying up for the future and the problems I hope to conquer next!

I write fantasy. If you read fantasy novels, you’ve probably noticed a trend: books rarely stand alone (unlike the cheese). That doesn’t mean the story isn’t self-contained, but often, there are overlaying archs that are worked towards, independently of the novel’s internal story arch.

There are a lot of things to think about before starting your second book. If you’d like to avoid 2nd book problems, there’s only way way to do that.

Refuse to write them!

But for the rest of us, there are some questions we need to ask.

When is too soon to start plotting your sequel?

Before you get started?

Some say that no plan survives the first encounter with the enemy– or at least that plans and outlines should be seen more as guidelines than rules.

Get A General Idea First?

Some say it never hurts to know where you’re starting and where you’re hoping to end up.

Pantsers!

Some like to follow the story and see where it goes, flying by the seat of their pants.

Should You Change Point-Of-View?

In Romance series, it’s often expected. You typically branch off and pair off all the friends of all the brides and grooms.

It can be done well. Personally, I’d suggest:

  • If your first book was single POV, to add no more than two new ones.
  • No matter your POV (or POVs), you need to grant some continuity. Either:
    • keep at least one main character.
    • have the new main characters as the tertiary characters from the first.
    • have the new main characters as ancestors/descendants of the main characters from the first.

How Much To Reintroduce!

You want new readers to know enough about what’s going on, old readers to be tactfully reminded of what happened in the previous book(s), and readers speeding through the series to not get bored!

It’s a tough tightrope to walk!

As always, with background info, an eyedropper is better than a dump truck.

Techniques to try:

  • Flashbacks to a previous book
  • Prologue or scenes replayed — from a new character’s point-of-view

Giving too much information in the beginning of a story is a standard error. Says Jo Lindsay Walton:

Bad books are often not a bad read–if you start in the middle, [after all that exposition]! – Jo Lindsay Walton

Problems With Cannon!

When you’re writing a sequel–especially one you’d never expected to write, the story may take you in new directions, where you find yourself painted into a corner.

You may have missed the opportunity to hint at someone turning into the bad guy, the new story arch that should have been underlying the first one, or given characters traits that are now plot-stumbling blocks.

But! You can also find the limitations help give the book direction you might have otherwise floundered at.

When To Start Thinking About Series Themed Titles!

The time to think about series titles is right about the time you’re ready to publish book one, if you have ANY notion of ever playing in that same world again. Don’t worry about it before you have a final title for the novel!

And remember. The series name itself must be STRONG.

A Song of Ice and Fire, while whimsical and a hint at later plot developments, never caught on as strongly as Game of Thrones

The title names can be themed, alliterative, story/plot derived, etc. Whatever you (or the publisher) thinks will sell.

What To Do When You’d Never Intended A Sequel But Reader Demand Is Strong!?

Brainstorm when you’re writing your novels where else you can go. Leave threads open! Life isn’t nice and neat, you shouldn’t have everything wrapped up with a bow when the reader hits: “THE END.”

  • Are there things the main character wanted or needed to do next?
  • Are there secondary characters who deserve their own book?
  • Would a prequel novel make sense?
  • Would a generation-skip-ahead novel make sense?

What Is The Hardest Part of Book Two?

Hands down: making the story’s plot and emotional arch strong enough to stand alone.

You still need an inciting incident.

You still need struggles and nearly un-surmountable odds.

You still need that false victory.

And that crushing blow, snatching defeat from the jaws of victory, that makes the main character (and the reader) feel that hope might be lost.

And you still need that climax – that restores hope, gives a sense of accomplishment.

Plus–even if there’s another sequel coming–you need a denouement. The falling action that grants the character time to take a deep breath and reassess and make plans.


If you’re working on that sequel – best of luck. If you’re dreaming about the day when it’s your turn? The best way to make that happen is to finish book one!

 

These notes are taken from the titular panel. The panelists were Annie Bellet, Jo Lindsay Walton, Katri Alatals, and Laura Lam. The panel was moderated by NS Dolkart.
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